This stroke analysis includes a moving sequence in real time, a moving sequence where each frame is displayed for .5 of a second, and still frames.

The following image sequence is in real time. It will play through 10 times and then stop. To repeat the sequence, click the browser's "refresh" or "reload" button.

lk100fin1

The following image sequence shows each frame for half a second. It will play through 10 times and then stop. To repeat the sequence, click the browser's "refresh" or "reload" button.

lk100fin5

At the end of the following narrative, each frame is illustrated in detail in a sequential collage.

There was considerable criticism of Lenny Krayzelberg's finishes in his backstroke races at the 2000 Olympic Games. A contention was that his finish was illegal.

The FINA rule for backstroke states:

SW 6.3 Some part of the swimmer must break the surface of the water throughout the race, except it shall be permissible for the swimmer to be completely submerged during the turn and for a distance of not more than 15 metres after the start and each turn. By that point the head must have broken the surface. [FINA Handbook 1996-1998, p. 137]

This rule implies that a swimmer must have some part of him/her above the surface while swimming after 15 m and at the finish (which is not a turn).

This analysis leaves to the reader, the decision of whether Lenny Krayzelberg's turn in the 100 m backstroke final was legal. One interpretation is that he completely submerges before touching the wall. For contrast purposes, the still collage at the end of this presentation includes the moment of touch in the semifinal and a series leading up to the touch in the final.

lk100fin